New MINDHUNTER Teaser and Artwork

Banner: Mindhunter (Twitter)

TeaserMotive is Elusive (Extra) (Netflix)

For decades, they’ve been solving murder cases using tried and true methods. But now it’s the ’70s and they’re hunting a whole new kind of killer.

Video PosterMindhunter (Instagram)

MINDHUNTER Photography by David Fincher.

2017-09-18 Mindhunter (Instagram) 03

VES 70: The Most Influential Visual Effects Films of All Time

10 years after releasing the “VES 50: The Most Influential Visual Effects Films of All Time“, a list voted by its members, the Visual Effects Society (VES) has celebrated its 20th anniversary with an expanded list (of 72 films in total, due to ties), which now includes The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008):

300 (2007), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), A Trip to the Moon (1902), The Abyss (1989), Alien (1979), Aliens (1986), An American Werewolf in London (1981), Apollo 13 (1995), Avatar (2009), Babe (1995), Back to the Future (1985), Blade Runner (1982), Citizen Kane (1941), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), Darby O’Gill and the Little People (1958), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), District 9 (2009), E.T. the Extraterrestrial (1982), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Ex Machina (2015), Fantastic Voyage (1966), The Fifth Element (1997), Forbidden Planet (1956), Forrest Gump (1994), Gertie the Dinosaur (1914), Ghostbusters (1984), Godzilla (1954), Gravity (2013), Inception (2010), Independence Day (1996), Jason and the Argonauts (1963), Jaws (1975), Jurassic Park (1993), King Kong (1933), King Kong (2005), Life of Pi (2012), The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002), The Lost World (1925), Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), Mary Poppins (1964), The Mask (1994), The Matrix (1999), Metropolis (1927), Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (2006), Planet of the Apes (1968), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Return of the Jedi (1983), Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011), The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad (1958), Sin City (2005), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Star Wars (1977), Starship Troopers (1997), Superman: The Movie (1978), The Ten Commandments (1956), The Terminator (1984), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), The Thing (1982), Titanic (1997), Total Recall (1990), Toy Story (1995), Tron (1982), Transformers (2007), Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), The War of the Worlds (1953), The Wizard of Oz (1939), What Dreams May Come (1998), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988).

VES Board Chair Mike Chambers said:

“The VES 70 represents films that have had a significant, lasting impact on the practice and appreciation of visual effects as an integral element of cinematic expression and storytelling.”

“We see this as an important opportunity for our members, leading visual effects practitioners worldwide, to pay homage to our heritage and help shape the future of the global visual effects community. In keeping with our mission to recognize and advance outstanding art and innovation in the VFX field, the VES 70 now forms a part of our legacy that we can pass down to future generations of filmmakers as a valuable point of reference.”

Visual Effects Society (vimeo)
September 11, 2017
vimeo

The Game and Fincher’s Perfect Lonely Protagonist

Posted by Christopher Aguiar | Aug 31, 2017
Audiences Everywhere

Much is said about David Fincher’s obsession with detail, every frame having to believably exist in the world he has created. Furthermore, this attention to detail extends beyond visual narrative storytelling. It also commands every protagonist Fincher has ever brought to life.

One character in particular most mirrors Fincher’s own obsession with perfection—Michael Douglas’ Nicholas van Orton. In The Game, Douglas portrays a character so seduced by the compulsion to maintain his lavish lifestyle that he has subjected himself to a lonely state of living.

It is within the character of van Orton that Fincher brings to life his most honest portrayal of loneliness. Whereas in Gone Girl we were shown loneliness through the prism of married life, or within Fight Club by the shackles of a consumerist society, The Game projects loneliness in its truest form. Unless others place themselves in the same vicinity as van Orton, our protagonist never engages with humanity. He is as internally isolated as he is externally.

Read the full article

Mr Nerdista
Published on Aug 30, 2017
YouTube

Art of the Title: Angus Wall & Elastic

Art of the Title: Angus Wall

Art of the Title: Elastic

In Studio Partners:

Design: Elastic
Editorial: Rock Paper Scissors
VFX: a52

Still Image © Joe LaMattina