George Michael and David Fincher’s “Freedom! ’90” Music Video Gets a 4K Remaster

2017-11-09 Studio Daily - George Michael and David Fincher_s “Freedom! _90” Music Video Gets a 4K Remaster 03

Headjar Productions Scanned More Than 30,000 Feet of Archival Footage for Channel 4 Documentary

By Bryant Frazer / November 9, 2017
Studio Daily

An iconic music video has gotten a rare 4K remaster. As part of a documentary project for U.K. broadcaster Channel 4, director David Fincher’s promo clip for the late George Michael’s “Freedom! ’90” featuring supermodels Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford has been rescanned from the original camera negatives at 4K on a Blackmagic Design Cintel Scanner and graded in Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve Studio to match the look of the original, NTSC-resolution music video.

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Blackmagic Cintel Scanner Used on Channel 4 George Michael Documentary

November 8, 2017
Black Magic Design

“75,000 feet of Rushes Discovered in a Vault”

Reported by Joe Frady

George Michael – Freedom ’90 Music Video Outtakes

George Michael VEVO
Published on 26 Sep 2017
YouTube

 

TRAILER | George Michael: Freedom | Coming Soon

Channel 4
Published on Sep 15, 2017
YouTube

The documentary will air on October 16 on Channel 4 and on October 21st on Showtime.

 

George Michael – Freedom! ’90 (Official Video)

George Michael VEVO
Published on Oct 2, 2009
YouTube

Directed by David Fincher
Director of Photography: Mike Southon, BSC

Watching the Music Videos of David Fincher

Posted by Sean W. Fallon | Aug 30, 2017
Audiences Everywhere

David Fincher has developed a very distinct style over the years as he has cemented himself as one of our most impressive technical filmmakers. Fincher has a great hold on characters and story, but he stands out because his mechanical, almost robotic, style of filmmaking is so recognisable and effective. His movies are distinguishable by a number of trademarks and signature moves. Fincher likes washed-out colours with lots of metallic blues and greys along with crushed blacks, which makes his movies seem as though they’re being projected to us on a piece of frozen metal. He also avoids handheld camera work, opting instead for a locked down camera that pans and pivots around a scene with balanced, unnatural movement, which enhances the feeling of an omniscient camera that is operating independently of a human being and not subject to control. He also enjoys locking the camera in place and filming wide, stationary shots as though we are watching the action play out on a stage at a theatre.

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