Zodiac: The Unofficial Reading List

Hint of Film (YouTube)
May 21, 2018

What better way to pay tribute to a movie about obsession than to obsessively track down every single book in the movie?

Video Credits:

Edited by H. Nelson Tracey
H. Nelson Tracey (Twitter)
Hint of Film (Twitter)
Director of Photography: Tommy Oceanak
Original Music by Bryan Hume
“Graysmith’s Remix” end credits song by Unofficial B

The Complete List:

Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories (1958) by Dr. Seuss
The Code Breakers (1967) by David Kahn
Codes and Ciphers: Secret Writing Through the Ages (1964) by John Laffin
Secret Writing: The Craft of the Cryptographer (1970) by James Raymond Wolfe
The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) film directed by Eugene Lourie
Dick Tracy Lunchbox, 1967
Animal Crackers (cookie)
The Most Dangerous Game (1932) film directed by Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsack
Hair, original musical poster, show debut in 1967
They Laughed When I Sat Down: An Informal History of Advertising in Words and Pictures (1959) by Frank Rowsome, Jr.
McElligot’s Pool (1947) by Dr. Seuss
TIME Magazine “Race and Reform on Campus,” Volume 93 No. 16, April 18, 1969
The Asphalt Jungle (1950) film directed by John Huston
The Wrong Man (1956) film directed by Alfred Hitchcock
The Celebrated Cases of Dick Tracy, 1931-1951 (Anthology, 1970) by Chester Gould
Fox in Socks (1965) by Dr. Seuss
Curtain and The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1975) by Agatha Christie
An Artist in America (1951) by Thomas Hart Benton
Drawing: Seeing and Observation (1973) by Ian Simpson
Drawing the Female Figure (1975) by Joseph Sheppard
Mainstreams of Modern Art: David to Picasso (1961) by John Canaday
Homicide Investigation (first published 1944) by Lemoyne Snyder
Rescued in the Clouds (1927) by Franklin W. Dixon
LIFE Magazine “Confrontation in Harvard Yard,” Vol. 66 No. 16, April 25, 1969
Slinky Toy Commercial from the 1960s
Slinky Toy
I Died A Thousand Times (1955) film directed by Stuart Heisler
Star Trek, Season 3 Episode 4 “And the Children Shall Lead” (1968) guest starring Melvin Belli, portrayed by Brian Cox in Zodiac
Aquavelva (alcoholic drink)
Reprise: The Code Breakers (1967) by David Kahn
Reprise: Codes and Ciphers (1964) by John Laffin
Richard Nixon Presidential Campaign Button, 1968
“I Am Not Avery” button
6 extremely rare first edition covers of Ian Fleming James Bond Novels: Dr. No (1958), For Your Eyes Only (1960), Moonraker (1955), On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1963), You Only Live Twice (1964), The Spy Who Loved Me (1962)
Six Crises (1962) by Richard M. Nixon
San Francisco (first published 1969) edited by Jack McDowell and Dorothy Krell
The Selling of the President, 1968 (1969) by Joe McGinniss
Rubber Life Magazine, Vol. 01, No. 01, (1972)
Dirty Harry (1971) film directed by Don Siegel
Pong (1972) video game by Atari
– I Looked and Listened: Informal Recollections of Radio and TV (1970) by Ben Gross
– The Crime Vaccine: How to End the Crime Epidemic (1996) by Jay B. Marcus
The FBI in Our Open Society (1969) by Harry & Bonaro Overstreet
– Kidnap: The Story of the Lindbergh Case (1961) by George Waller
The Property Man (1914) film directed by Charlie Chaplin
– McCall’s Sewing Book (1968) by McCall Corporation
– Them! (1954) film directed by Gordon Douglas
Illegal (1955) film directed by Lewis Allen
– The World Almanac – Centennial Edition (1968)
– The Rink (1916) film directed by Charlie Chaplin
– Conquest (1937) film directed by Clarence Brown and Gustav Marchaty
Key Largo (1948) film directed by John Huston
– Zodiac: The Shocking True Story of the Nation’s Most Bizarre Mass Murderer (1986) by Robert Graysmith

Zodiac (2007) Credits:

Directed by David Fincher
Production Design by Donald G. Burt
Art Direction by Keith Cunningham
Set Decoration by Victor J. Zolfo

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Recreating the Mindhunter Reel-to-Reel titles (minus the corpses)

Techmoan (YouTube)
May 5, 2018

A ‘joyously nerdy’ video in which I attempt to assemble all the components to recreate the reel-to-reel title sequence from the Netflix Show Mindhunter.

hifiengine: the Portable Stereo Reel-to-Reel Tape Recorder Sony TC-510-2 (or Sony TC-5550-2 in Japan)

The Tapeheads forums: “Looking for the sony tc-510

The RPF forums: “The Tape Recorder from Netflix MINDHUNTER” (“David wants perfect”)

New Mindhunter style metal 5″ reels can be bought from Righteous Reels.

Special thanks to Jason Moore (on Patreon) for the tip regarding The Professionals episode.

The music used in my recreation of the title sequence is ‘Spirit Of the Dead‘ – by Aakash Ghandi and is from the youtube audio library (Download link).

 

NOTE: The TDK tape leader was created specifically for the sequence with CGI to hide the original Sony one:

Ollin VFX 2018 Demo reel

Ollin VFX (vimeo)
December 12, 2017

Thanks to Andrew Moore

Time Hunters

David Fincher went looking for the 1970s — and found them in Pittsburgh. but that was just the start for the esteemed producer-director and his team, who recreated the era for Mindhunter, the Netflix series about two pioneering FBI profilers.

Liane Bonin Starr
April 13, 2018
Emmys (Television Academy) / Emmy Magazine

Watching the Netflix series Mindhunter, you may shudder as convicted serial killer Ed Kemper (Cameron Britton) casually chats about his string of brutal murders, or flinch when — spoiler alert! — a bird hits the fan courtesy of mass murderer Richard Speck (Jack Erdie).

What you’re less likely to notice is the precision with which the show’s late-’70s landscape has been created. David Fincher considers that a win.

“It’s really important that it feels like two people having a conversation — and that 40 people aren’t on their iPhones simultaneously just outside of frame,” says Fincher, who is executive-producing the series with Joshua Donen, Charlize Theron and Ceán Chaffin. “The great news is, I lived through the ’70s, so I remember what that looks like.”

Created by Joe Penhall — and based loosely on FBI agent John Douglas‘s book Mindhunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit — the series explores the birth of criminal profiling.

Special agent Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff, playing a fictionalized version of Douglas) and his partner, Bill Tench (Holt McCallany), work alongside psychologist Wendy Carr (Anna Torv) to dig into what makes murderers tick. Shot in Pittsburgh, the show is a window on a time before the term serial killer had been coined, much less become the focus of TV shows and casual conversations.

While that seemingly more innocent time is reflected partly in the show’s relative lack of gore, the decade’s thornier complexities required a critical eye (or, in this case, eyes) to see past the polyester-covered clichés.

“David is the most holistic filmmaker I’ve ever met,” director of photography Erik Messerschmidt says. “The tone of every scene is important, and [so are] how the costumes and lighting and set decoration and everything play a part in creating the finished product.”

Fincher, who directed four of the first season’s 10 episodes, is famously meticulous, but he says the secret to getting it right is finding the right people.

“I don’t think you keep a project in a kind of design and aesthetic wheelhouse by being a dictatorial influence. Just stomping your feet and holding your breath is not going to make stuff work,” he says. “A lot of times, you have to empower people who are the advance troops and the follow-up troops to make decisions that are based on conversations that you have.”

In this case, one of the first decisions — where to shoot — was daunting.

“Our biggest issue,” Fincher says, “was: where do we find 1978?”

Read the full profile

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Thanks to Mindhunter News

Making the Lounge from Gone Girl in 20 minutes in Blender

Andrew Price
April 12, 2018
Blender Guru (YouTube)

A homage to one of my favourite David Fincher films: Gone Girl! In this summary tutorial, I’ll show you how I recreated the lounge room from Gone Girl.

Textures from Poliigonlinks

Gone Girl Lounge

Andrew Price
April 12, 2018
ArtStation

I loved the lighting and cool palette of Gone Girl, and wondered if there was any “secret” to making it look like this. So as a learning exercise, I recreated the lounge room entirely in Blender and rendered with Cycles.

Took about 30 hours to create in total + another 49 hours for the tutorial.

Blender Guru

Thanks to FincherFanatic

Interiors: Steve Arnold, Mindhunter

InteriorsMehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian
January 19, 2018
Interiors

The television show, Mindhunter, created by Joe Penhall and executive produced and directed by David Fincher, is one of the most visually distinctive shows and for good reason. David Fincher’s filmography has become something that we aren’t used to seeing. From the Cinematography to the Production Design, Fincher has achieved a level of mastery that other films and television shows do not seem to have.

Based primarily in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the show depicts incredible locations and interior spaces, such as a variety of interrogation rooms that are both visually stunning and exceptionally detailed.

In an exclusive interview with Interiors, we spoke with Steve Arnold, who is the Production Designer for Mindhunter. The images are property of Steve Arnold and his team.

Read the full interview

Interiors. Dwight's House

2017 ADG Awards Presentations. Mindhunter, Steve Arnold

Art Directors Guild

2017 ADG Awards Presentations

Category I: One Hour Period or Fantasy Single-Camera Series

Mindhunter

S1:E1 Episode 1
S1:E4 Episode 4
S1:E9 Episode 9

2013 Steve Arnold
Steve Arnold
Production Designer
steve-arnold.com

Design Presentation (PDF):

Interiors: The spaces in David Fincher’s films

Interiors

Interiors is an online film and architecture journal, published by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian, that analyses and diagrams films in terms of space.

 

A Pair of Artists Use Architecture to Study Film

The founders of “Interiors,” a journal dedicated to film and architecture, diagram scenes from movies such as “Fight Club,” “Psycho,” and more.

Colin Warren-Hicks
January 30, 2014
Metropolis

 

INTERIORS: David Fincher

If cinema is a matter of what’s in the frame, David Fincher is an artist who is very much concerned about all four corners of his canvas.

by INTERIORS Journal
June 3, 2013
ArchDaily

 

Panic Room (2002)

“Their positioning throughout the scene provides us with an understanding of how David Fincher uses space within the film, and in doing so, how he also maintains the architectural integrity of the film.”

Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian
2012-01
Interiors

 

Se7en (1995)

“The vastness of the desert around them emphasizes the fact that the handcuffed John Doe is captured; a lack of freedom despite the free space around him.”

Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian
2013-01
Interiors

 

Fight Club (1999)

“David Fincher switches from a subjective perspective onto an objective perspective after the reveal has been made.”

Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian
2014-01
Interiors