New MINDHUNTER Teaser and Artwork

Banner: Mindhunter (Twitter)

TeaserMotive is Elusive (Extra) (Netflix)

For decades, they’ve been solving murder cases using tried and true methods. But now it’s the ’70s and they’re hunting a whole new kind of killer.

Video PosterMindhunter (Instagram)

MINDHUNTER Photography by David Fincher.

2017-09-18 Mindhunter (Instagram) 03

Mindhunter production workflow based around Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Adobe Premiere used on big new 10-part Netflix TV series

Alex Gollner
13 September 2017
Alex4D

It was tough ask for Adobe Premiere to tackle the needs of David Fincher‘s ‘Gone Girl‘ feature film in 2014. In recent months, it has been used on a bigger project: ‘Mindhunter’ – a 10 hour David Fincher exec-produced high-end TV series soon to be available on Netflix.

Instead of a single team working on a two hour film, TV series have multiple director-cinematographer-editor teams working in parallel. In this case the pilot was directed by David Fincher. The way TV works in the US is that the pilot director gets an executive producer credit for the whole series because the decisions they make define the feel of the show from then on. Fincher brought along some of the team who worked on Gone Girl. While they worked on the pilot post production, other teams shot and edited later episodes in the series.

The fact that the production company and the studio were happy for the workflow to be based around Premiere Pro CC is a major step up for Adobe in Hollywood.

The high-end market Adobe is going for is too small to support profitable software development. Even if they sold a subscription to all professional editors in the USA, that would not be enough to pay for the costs in maintaining Adobe Premiere. Its use in high-end TV and features is a marketing message that Adobe must think contributes to people choosing to subscribe to the Adobe Creative Cloud – even if renters will never edit a Hollywood film or TV show.

[…]


Adobe Unveils Breakthroughs in Video and Film Production

April 13, 2016
Adobe, News


Editing Feature Films in Premiere Pro

Jonny Elwyn, Film Editor
September 14, 2017


The Making of Gone Girl

Jonny Elwyn, Film Editor
October 7, 2014

VES 70: The Most Influential Visual Effects Films of All Time

10 years after releasing the “VES 50: The Most Influential Visual Effects Films of All Time“, a list voted by its members, the Visual Effects Society (VES) has celebrated its 20th anniversary with an expanded list (of 72 films in total, due to ties), which now includes The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008):

300 (2007), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), A Trip to the Moon (1902), The Abyss (1989), Alien (1979), Aliens (1986), An American Werewolf in London (1981), Apollo 13 (1995), Avatar (2009), Babe (1995), Back to the Future (1985), Blade Runner (1982), Citizen Kane (1941), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), Darby O’Gill and the Little People (1958), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), District 9 (2009), E.T. the Extraterrestrial (1982), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Ex Machina (2015), Fantastic Voyage (1966), The Fifth Element (1997), Forbidden Planet (1956), Forrest Gump (1994), Gertie the Dinosaur (1914), Ghostbusters (1984), Godzilla (1954), Gravity (2013), Inception (2010), Independence Day (1996), Jason and the Argonauts (1963), Jaws (1975), Jurassic Park (1993), King Kong (1933), King Kong (2005), Life of Pi (2012), The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002), The Lost World (1925), Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), Mary Poppins (1964), The Mask (1994), The Matrix (1999), Metropolis (1927), Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (2006), Planet of the Apes (1968), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Return of the Jedi (1983), Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011), The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad (1958), Sin City (2005), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Star Wars (1977), Starship Troopers (1997), Superman: The Movie (1978), The Ten Commandments (1956), The Terminator (1984), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), The Thing (1982), Titanic (1997), Total Recall (1990), Toy Story (1995), Tron (1982), Transformers (2007), Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), The War of the Worlds (1953), The Wizard of Oz (1939), What Dreams May Come (1998), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988).

VES Board Chair Mike Chambers said:

“The VES 70 represents films that have had a significant, lasting impact on the practice and appreciation of visual effects as an integral element of cinematic expression and storytelling.”

“We see this as an important opportunity for our members, leading visual effects practitioners worldwide, to pay homage to our heritage and help shape the future of the global visual effects community. In keeping with our mission to recognize and advance outstanding art and innovation in the VFX field, the VES 70 now forms a part of our legacy that we can pass down to future generations of filmmakers as a valuable point of reference.”

Visual Effects Society (vimeo)
September 11, 2017
vimeo

Playing ‘The Game’ on Its 20th Anniversary – David Fincher’s 1997 Film Still Holds Up

Posted on September 12th, 2017 by Joshua Meyer
/Film

More than any other mainstream filmmaker, David Fincher is the one who has had his finger on the pulse of our generational concerns. If you Google Fincher’s name and the word “zeitgeist,” it will immediately turn up countless think pieces talking about how his films — especially Fight Club and The Social Network — have captured the zeitgeist, reflecting the spirit of their time the way The Graduate did for the 1960s.

But The Game, Fincher’s 1997 thriller starring Michael Douglas, was a necessary primer for Fight Club. With this film, Fincher took the actor who played Gordon Gekko ten years earlier, and he gave that ‘80s zeitgeist figure a light makeover and put him in a post-grunge ‘90s movie.

The Game turns 20 today (it hit theaters on September 12, 1997), so let’s take a look back at what makes it so special: not only for the way it marked a turning point in Fincher’s early career, but also for the way it takes a high-concept story and manages to bake in a fair amount of subtext.

Read the full article

20 Years Later, ‘The Game’ Is Still David Fincher’s Most Underrated Movie

Colin Biggs
September 12, 2017
ScreenCrush

“I don’t care about the money. I’m pulling back the curtain. I want to meet the wizard.”

Michael Douglas’ disheveled Nicholas Van Orton is one of the most powerful men in the United States, so why is he holding a man hostage and demanding answers? When David Fincher’s The Game came out in 1997, it was received as a control freak’s nightmare. A vision that could only have come from the mind of one of cinema’s most talented young directors. Today, Consumer Recreation Services could be any company on the street. With unlimited access to data from social media and emails, a small group of technicians could manufacture their own reality. In a time of alt-facts, when the nature of truth is constantly up for debate, The Game feels far more significant than its reputation as middle-tier a David Fincher project.

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Fear Itself: David Fincher’s THE GAME At 20

Twenty years later, Jacob revisits the master filmmaker’s technically accomplished dissertation on anxiety and desire.

By Jacob Knight
Sep. 12, 2017
Birth. Movies. Death.

When David Fincher was pitching his adaptation of Spider-Man during the ’90s, the key element that ruled out his take with studio execs was the refusal to execute another feature length origin tale. In Fincher’s version, our friendly neighborhood web-head was going to have his backstory explained via an opening mini-operetta, which would get his superhero coming of age out of the way so the fastidious Hollywood technician could tell the story he wanted to tell. This idiosyncratic approach rubbed suits the wrong way, but was repurposed for The Game (’97), Fincher’s Hitchcockian follow-up to the smash bit of serial killer morbidity, Seven (’95).

We’re introduced to Nicholas Van Orton (Michael Douglas) via a series of home movies. It’s Nicholas’ birthday party at his family’s lavish estate, and the kid is all half-assed smirks, the sparks of candles placed on an unseen cake illuminating his face like fireworks. Yet whenever his father is around, Nicholas tenses; the patriarch’s distant gazes and unsubtle grimaces casting a long shadow over what should’ve been a festive day. This is all foreshadowing; letting us know exactly what type of man Nicholas is going to turn out to be. There’s no radioactive spider, or magical transformation. Genes are all that’s required to transmute Mr. Van Orton into a shadow of his soon to be suicidal father – an ultimate, and probably unavoidable, fate.

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The Ultimate Plate Van for MINDHUNTER

From Jarred Land (Facebook) with Matthew Tremblay (Facebook), and Christopher Probst (Instagram)

Jarred Land (President at RED):

David Fincher‘s insane Plate Van for Mindhunter. 11 Epic Dragons on Global Dynamics United Tilt Plates all triggered by one detonator. Great Design Colab between Fincher, Myself and Christopher Probst.

All things considered, this wasn’t actually as expensive as it would seem.

I had a bunch of the 80/20 extrusions left over from previous projects and those Black Magic monitors I bought for super cheap online. My engineers built the 11 camera trigger out of a left over battery shell for about $40 in parts.

The initial design process was super efficient because 80/20 has plugins for SolidWorks so Fincher and I spent a lot of time on the computer pre-visualizing everything and we could figure out the weak links very quickly before we even had the van.

The GDU low profile bombproof tilt plates which Fincher, Matthew Tremblay and I designed we built just for this (which became the GDU tilt plates) seemed exotic but was actually way more cost effective than buying or renting dutch or tango heads that were expensive and not really made for what we were using them for. Remember this is a multi-year show so they actually are saving a ton of money designing it and building it rather than just renting everything for such a long period of time… it likely has already paid for itself.

This is just the prototype of something Fincher and I have been working on for a few years now and it’s going to get way way more badass as time goes on.

Christopher Probst:

Click to enlarge and read descriptions