Ren Klyce and Jeremy Molod of ‘Mank’ Break Their Silence on the Sound Secrets of 1940s

Rich Quinn (ADR editor), Jonathon Stevens (Sound Effects Editor), Jeremy Molod (Supervising Sound Editor), Malcolm Fife (Sound Effects Editor), Ren Klyce (Sound Designer/Re-Recording Mixer).

Patrick Z. McGavin
December 2, 2020
CineMontage

Orson Welles famously observed a writer needs a pen, a painter a brush, and a filmmaker an army.

One of the soldiers behind Welles’ most fabled work is at the heart of David Fincher’s new Netflix film “Mank,” which excavates a creation myth from the contentious backstory of “Citizen Kane,” Welles’ 1941 feature directing debut. Many critics consider it one of the best films ever made.

Fincher commanded his own army of Foley artists, dialog editors and sound specialists for his iconoclastic biographical portrait of the screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz (Gary Oldman).

Verisimilitude was the most pressing concern in crafting a symphonic soundtrack of rare cars, Underwood typewriters and vintage telephones.

Sound designer/re-recording mixer Ren Klyce and supervising sound editor Jeremy Molod have worked on every Fincher movie since his breakthrough second feature, “Se7en” (1995).

“We know what Fincher is trying to get at when he is giving us directions,” Molod said. “Sometimes when he is asking us to provide certain sounds and he gives us a description of what the character or location is, it’s not always meant to be a literal translation.

“It’s more of a feeling and what he is trying to convey.”

Klyce assembled an impressive and highly experienced editorial team that included dialog editors Kim Fosacto and Richard Quinn, Foley editor Shaun Farley and the FX editor Malcom Fife and his team, Jonathon Stevens, Josh Gold and Coya Elliott.

Most important they all had a deep work background with the fastidiously exacting filmmaker.

Read the full interview

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